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How to trade options- learn Options Trading Basics

Options trading can be complicated  more than stock trading. When you purchase a stock, you choose  how many shares you want, and your broker fills the order at the current market price or at a limit price. Trading options needs some of these factors, as well as many others, including a more huge process for creating an account.

Consider the basic  factors in an how to trade options:

When you take out an option, you’re purchasing a contract to buy or sell a stock, usually 100 shares of the stock per contract, at a pre-negotiated price by a certain date. In order to place the trade, you must make three strategic choices:

Determine which way you think the stock is going to move.

Guess how high or low the stock price will move from its prevailing price.

Decide the time frame during which the stock is likely to move.

1.Determine which way you think the stock is going to move.

This decides what type of options agreement you take on. If you think the cost  of a stock will boost, you’ll buy a call option. A call option is a contract that gives you the right, but not the commitment, to buy a stock at a pre-decided price (called the strike price) within a certain time period.

If you think the cost  of a stock will goes down, you’ll buy a put option. A put option gives you the right, but not the responsibility to sell shares at a stated price before the agreement expires.

2.Guess how high or low the stock price will move from its prevailing price.

An option remains beneficial only if the stock price closes the option’s termination  span “in the money.” That means either above or below the strike price. The strike price is the specified price at which an option contract can be exercised. The strike price, also called as the exercise price.You’ll want to purchase an option with a exercise price that replicate where you guess the stock will be during the option’s lifetime.

For example, if you trust the share cost  of a company currently trading for $100 is going to boost to $120 by some future date, you’d buy a call option with a pre-decided price less than $120 (ideally a strike price no higher than $120 minus the cost of the option, so that the option remains profitable at $120). If the stock does surely hike above the strike price, your option is in the money.

Similarly, if you trust  the company’s share price is going to decrease  to $80, you’d purchase a put option (giving you the right to sell shares) with a pre-decided price above $80 (ideally a strike price no lower than $80 plus the cost of the option, so that the option remains profitable at $80). If the stock drop below the strike price, your option is in the money.

You can’t select  just any exercise price. Option quotes, technically called option chains, contain a variety of available strike prices. The increments between strike prices are standardized across the industry — for example, $1, $2.50, $5, $10,$20 — and are based on the stock price.

The cost you pay for an option, called the premium, has two element: intrinsic value and time value. Intrinsic value is the difference between the pre-decided and the share price, if the stock price is above the strike. Time cost is whatever is left, and factors in how changeable the stock is, the time to termination and interest rates, among other elements. For example, suppose you have a $1200 call option while the stock costs $210. Let’s assume the option’s premium is $15.

The intrinsic value is $10 ($210 minus $200), while time value is $5.This leads us to the final choice you need to make before purchasing an options agreement.

3.Decide the time frame during which the stock is likely to move.

Every options bond has an termination date that shows  the last day you can exercise the option. Here, too, you can’t just pull a date out of thin air. Your selections are limited to the ones provide when you call up an option chain.

Termination  dates can range from days to months to years. Day to day and weekly options inclined be the riskiest and are booked for seasoned option traders. For long-term investors, monthly and yearly closing dates are desirable. Longer Termination give the stock more time to process or move and time for your investment assumption to play out.

A longer  termination is also useful because the option can keep time value, even if the stock trades below the strike price. An option’s time value decays as expiration approaches, and options buyers don’t want to see their purchased options drop in value, potentially closing worthless if the stock finishes below the strike price. If a trade has gone against them, they can usually still sell any time value remaining on the option — and this is more likely if the option contract is longer.

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